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Q

What are the benefits of reading as a teen?

A

Reading as a teen leads to success. When teens read more than just their school work, research clearly shows that they generally do well in school. First of all, the extra reading expands their vocabularies. It also shows them how different writers put down their thoughts leading to better writing skills. And teens who read more serious literary works gain skills in handling complex ideas. The more teens read, the more information they pick up. This leads to a solid core of knowledge that is useful in a wide variety of classes. 

Besides helping teens do well in school, reading also helps them expand their horizons as they learn more about people and the world. Plus, reading can show teens that everyone has problems in his or her life and may even help teens see solutions to their own problems. Finally, reading is enjoyable. It can bring a great deal of pleasure to teens.

Parents can encourage their children to stay involved with reading by expressing interest in what they are reading and tying it to other activities. If a teen is fascinated by racing stories, try to take the child to a race. If a teen likes a book that has been turned into a movie, make sure he or she sees the movie.

 10 benefits of reading 

 

Q

How can I support reading a home?

A

Top 10 tips..

Encourage your child to read at regularly at home. Make sure they are keep their ‘Reading this Week’ planner section up-to-date.

Read a more challenging text together by sharing a book before bedtime.

When reading together, encourage your child to compare and contrast different characters’ actions and emotions.

Ask your child to tell you about books they are reading independently, with their form tutors, in their English lessons. Ask them: what is the story about? Who are the characters? Which character do you like? What do you think is going to happen? How is this book similar or different to other books they’ve read?

Ask your child to show their understanding of the main parts of a text by describing what they know, giving examples or summarising the basic points in their own words, and then linking the ideas to their own personal experiences.

Support your child’s ability to retrieve information by asking them students questions, for example, ‘Tell me what you can remember about that chapter…’

Encourage your child to read a range of texts: fiction, non-fiction, newspaper articles, magazine articles, websites, etc. Encourage them to tell you about the ideas in the texts they are reading.

Point out and discuss challenging / new vocabulary when reading together.

Discuss our Word of the Week together; ask if your child can use it in a sentence; provide examples of the word used in different contexts.

Talk to your child about the vocabulary they are learning through their Bedrock homework. Is your child able to use these words in a sentence?  Are there any words they are struggling with?